Photo curtesy of Stockvault.net

Trick-or-Treat safety tips

Ways to stay safe this Halloween

Candy hazards to watch out for

-joking hazards for small children
-unwrapped candy, other food, or items
-allergy alerts
-anything that appears tampered with

*All candy should be checked by an adult before being consumed by a child

With Halloween just around the corner, the Toronto Police and Toronto Paramedics have both released their annual safety tips.

At the top of this year’s recommendations is encouraging children to use face makeup instead of masks.

“Masks can restrict vision and make it difficult for a child to see trip hazards and traffic,” said Kim McKinnon, the media contact for Toronto Paramedic Services.

If your children do wear a mask it is suggested that they push it up while walking. Other tips for ensuring a safe trick-or-treating experience are making sure costumes are no longer than ankle-length and that they include strips of reflective tape to improve visibility. As always, flashlights are also a must.

If you’re giving out candy this Halloween, the Toronto Police urge that the front of the house is well-lit to prevent accidents and that walkways are clear of clutter. Pet owners should keep a close eye on their animals and keep them away from the doorway.

Tomorrow night’s estimated temperature is projected at seven degrees with a low of four and there is a 70 per cent chance of rain, so layers and mittens are recommended. Umbrellas and rubber boots might also be a good fit.

If you will be driving this Halloween, CAA suggests avoiding residential areas between 6-9 p.m. If that is not possible, pay extra attention to your surroundings and stay below the speed limit.

For those interested in the “best” neighbourhoods for trick-or-treating, the Mowat Centre has a breakdown based on house density, the ratio of children under 14 and the lowest rates of crime and pedestrian collisions. Take a look at it here.