Notice give to vendors that the Saturday edition of the Toronto Star will now cost $3.50

Price of Toronto Star to increase

Saturday edition of Toronto Star to now cost $3.50

The price of the Saturday edition of the Toronto Star will rise from $3 to $3.50 on Sept. 19.

The Star also offers news at its website and on its tablet app, Star Touch, for free.

Convenience store owners are already hearing complaints about the price hike.

Emil Hihen (left) and Salim Higig (right) of Milk Mart Convenience, think the price increase will hurt seniors the most. (SCOTT DELL)
Emil Hihen (left) and Salim Higig of Milk Mart Convenience think the price increase will hurt seniors the most.

Salim Higig, owner of Milk Mart Convenience, says, “Two dollars, $10, $15 — we have to obey.”

Store employee Emil Hihen say he is already the effect firsthand: “A lot of people have been complaining.”

He caters to mostly senior citizens who have a hard time affording the price on a pension, he says.

Senior and Star reader Matthew Markovich sees this as a step in the wrong direction.

Matthew Markovich will not switch to digital news, no matter the price of the paper.
Matthew Markovich will not switch to digital news, no matter the price of the paper.

“They’re going to lose money.”

Markovich feels the paper needs to reduce the price, saying, “If you paid a dollar it would be all right.”

A lower price would be reasonable to many paper readers because they can get their newspapers for much less than that.

“I get my paper from McDonalds,” says Paul Eldon, a regular Star reader says. “It’s free.”

Melanie Martin also reads the Star whenever she comes across a copy.

Canadian Inflation Rates (2010–2015)

2015 – 1.61%
2014 – 1.47%
2013 – 1.24%
2012 – 0,83%
2011 – 2.30%
2010 – 2.35%

Source: inflation.eu

“Sometimes they are left on our doorstep, or in coffee shops where they have the free newspapers.”

Martin does purchase copies, but only to mark special occasions.

“We picked up the newspaper the day [son] Shawn was born and on Obama’s inauguration. I wouldn’t buy it day to day no matter how cheap it was.”

Martin echoes the sentiments of a new generation that gets news from the Internet because, “There’s a thousand other places I can get my news where I don’t have to pay for it.”

Those wishing to avoid the price hike can subscribe to the Toronto Star online.