Local artist wows with new gallery show

Liliana Vera’s interactive art exhibit will change and grow every day during its three-week life.

The artist, a student at Centennial College’s East York campus, says she will replace some works daily, and visitors can take some pieces home with them. The show, which she calls ‘Indelible’, is currently on display at the campus’s Corridor Arts Gallery.

Gentrification tugging at roots of Queen West neighbourhood

His shop is packed to the ceiling with antique mirrors, old microphones, Star Trek lunch boxes and tired-looking mannequins once used in Toronto department stores.

Abraham Shalechi stands behind the cluttered counter greeting the occasional customer, wandering in from the cold. He greets his patrons with a warm smile and allows them time to peruse his many treasures freely. Seldom does anyone purchase one of Shalechi’s unique wares.

Police association head warns against TPS budget cut

The union representing Toronto’s front line police officers says reductions to the police budget will have a noticeable impact on public safety.

On Tuesday, the City released its preliminary 2017 budget, which proposes a $4.4 million cut to annual police spending. Also included in the report are increases to property taxes and investment in public transit.

Mike McCormack, the president of the Toronto Police Association (TPA) warned that crime will rise as Toronto’s population increases.

“We have huge sporting events, (and Toronto is) a destination city,” McCormack said. “That’s a huge demand on police resources. There is clear evidence that properly deployed police officers have an impact on crime prevention.”

Veteran recalls his deadly role in D-Day invasion

On a moonlit night in June 1944, Martin Maxwell, a glider pilot with Allied forces, landed his aircraft near a bridge in Normandy, France. He then joined invasion troops seizing the bridge and quietly killing the German sentries with bayonets. Maxwell, 20, hadn’t even finished high school.

“It didn’t feel good, let me tell you that,” he said. “It changed my life; the war made me who I am.”

Maxwell, now 92, was born in Austria in 1924. He will be speaking of his service in the Second World War during a Remembrance Day observance at Centennial College’s East York campus on Nov. 11.

Park enthusiast wonders how public will get to new Don Valley super park

A regular visitor to Evergreen Brick Works says she wants the city to consult the public about improving transit to the city’s proposed new super park site.

At a press conference, Tuesday, Toronto Mayor John Tory announced that the city will begin work on creating the Don River Valley Park. This new park will become the second largest in the city and incorporate the Evergreen Brick Works site.

Scarborough residents cite racist experiences at anti-racism forum

A GTA resident says police and social workers have discriminated against her and she wants to see more unity between Black Lives Matter Toronto and the anti-racism directorate.

Cora Reid, a reggae artist from Bowmanville, Ont., spoke Wednesday evening at the provincial government’s anti-racism directorate forum in Scarborough. This was the fourth such meeting facilitated by MPP Michael Coteau, Ontario minister responsible for anti-racism.

Opposition says government hydro rebates not enough

Following Monday’s throne speech, the provincial legislature remains divided on the Liberal’s promise to reduce electricity costs for average Ontarians.

As announced in the throne speech, Ontario’s Liberal government will provide an eight per cent rebate on hydro costs, equal to the provincial share of the 13 per cent HST. Eligible rural customers will receive a rebate of 20 per cent each month, according to the throne speech. Laurie Scott, Progressive Conservative citizenship, immigration and international trade critic, argued in question period on Thursday that the rebate will not be enough for low income Ontarians.

“In my riding (there are) thousands of people who can’t cope with the stress of making their hydro payments,” Scott said.

Ex-Toronto police officer campaigns to lift PTSD stigma

Bill Rusk remembers June 24, 1990, as a pretty hot and clammy day.

Police officer Rusk and his partner were on patrol in a North York neighbourhood and tasked with arresting two suspects in a drug investigation. Around 1 a.m., Rusk began pursuing a suspect.

“I was between two vehicles and (the suspect) turned and yelled. I realized he had a handgun pointed at me,” Rusk said. “It was too late for me to pull (out) my firearm.”