PC leader attacks Ontario government policy on children with autism

Ontario’s Progressive Conservative leader says the government has deceived the parents seeking medical treatment for their children dealing with autism.

During Question Period, on Thursday, PC leader Patrick Brown referred to an article published by The Toronto Star. In it, Brown said, the Star pointed that last spring Ontario’s Liberal government cut the funding for children (aged five and up) who were promised treatment for their autism.

NDP criticizes Ontario government hydro rebate and child care plans

The leader of the NDP believes the Liberal government plan for hydro rebates and child care falls short of Ontario families’ expectations.

In Monday’s throne speech, the Wynne government announced an eight per cent hydro rebate to Ontarians and unveiled its plan to open 100,000 new child care spaces in 2017.

Andrea Horwath, the Ontario NDP leader, questioned the seriousness of the Liberal plan.

Opposition critical of government plan to assist Ontario children with autism

The leader of the Progressive Conservative Opposition, has expressed his concern in the Ontario legislature over the new funding program for families of children with autism.

PC leader Patrick Brown referred to an article released in The Toronto Star in which the Liberals’ own expert advisory panel cautioned them about putting an age gap on autism services. This would mean that children above the age of five on the waiting list might not receive the intensive behavioral intervention (IBI) that the government had promised.

Tributes for Hudak on last day in legislature

A long-time, Liberal MPP and political rival of Progressive Conservative Tim Hudak, on his last day in the legislature, described him as a man who never flip-flopped.

Hudak, who has served Niagara West-Glanbrook constituency since 1995, announced last month he was leaving politics. Elected at age 27, Hudak became PC leader in 2009, but lost provincial elections to the Liberals in both 2011 and 2014. Thursday, in the legislature, Jim Bradley, MPP for St. Catharines for the past 39 years, spoke of Hudak as a man with integrity.

“He didn’t pander to the issue of the day. He didn’t pander to individual interest groups and so on,” Bradley said.

Allies and rivals offer praise for outgoing MPP

A long-time member of the Ontario Progressive Conservative caucus offered personal thanks to retiring MPP Tim Hudak on his final day in the legislature.

Lisa MacLeod, MPP for Nepean-Carleton, paid tribute to former PC leader Hudak, Thursday morning, during his last appearance at Queen’s Park.

“I was struggling with depression,” MacLeod said. “He would sit with me, either here at Queen’s Park or on the phone when I was at home, and he would try to boost me up. Sometimes that was daily. That’s the Tim Hudak I know: well brought up, always deserving of my loyalty, always a friend.”

Opposition says government plan fails to assist children with autism

The leader of the Progressive Conservatives says the new autism program announced by the Ontario Liberal government will hurt not help Ontario familIes.

On Thursday during question period at Queen’s Park, the government and Opposition parties debated the issue following Monday’s throne speech, in which the government’s policies on children with autism were announced. PC leader Patrick Brown spoke against the government plan.

“This government has put families with children with autism through unimaginable pain,” Brown said.

PCs criticize Ontario government approach to hydro rates

The Ontario Progressive Conservative leader is critical of the Liberal government’s planned hydro rebates, but even more so of its planned sell-off of Hydro One shares.

At Queen’s Park on Thursday, MPP Deborah Matthews defended Liberal plans to offer hydro rebates for Ontario’s urban and rural regions. PC Opposition leader Patrick Brown reiterated his position after Monday’s throne speech.

“For the last two days, I have said that if the Liberals actually wanted to get hydro rates under control, they should stop signing ludicrous contracts,” he said.

Federal budget takes new approach to child benefits

When East York resident Michele Lupa first heard about the new Canada Child Benefit, she was surprised.

“Oh my god! How could I miss that?” she said. “They made a change to the child tax benefit.”

The mother of two, Lupa can apply for the benefit, which will pay families a monthly subsidy based on net income. The new benefit is tax-free and does not exclude families with only one parent.