North Carolina's Carter Jenkins carded a five-under par 67 on the final day of play at the University of South Florida Invitational Golf Tournament at the Lake Jovita Golf and Country Club.

North Carolina freshman shows top form at USF Invitational

Down-to-earth golfer displays poise at young age

DADE CITY, Fla. — His talent is evident.

When Carter Jenkins was 10-years-old, he was imperceptibly influenced towards golf by his law-professor father.

“My dad influenced me a lot. When he was young, he played golf very well,” Jenkins said. “He always pushed me to make myself better.”

On Tuesday the freshman golfer showed that same skill by posting a 67 at the 2014 USF invitational, while playing in his first ever University of North Carolina Greensboro team golf tournament. He finished tied for 11th, the fifth time he’s done so in his first seven college events.

Golf is an individual game that is different from a team game like baseball, hockey or basketball. For golf, you need more concentration and durability, something Jenkins has an abundance of.

“He really has a chance to compete and be one of the best players at the college,” said Terrance Stewart, Jenkins’s head coach. Stewart has been the head coach of UNCG’s men’s golf team since 2001.

Jenkins doesn’t have social media, which for a teenager is strange nowadays.

“I just feel nervous use them,” Jenkins said.

He spends much more time on his golfing career. Jenkins always practises before and after a round.

”Yes, I work very hard, because you can’t be successful if you don’t work hard.”

Even in the off-season he still plays golf every day.

“My dad really talked to me when I young age, he tried to modify myself in that way,” Jenkins said. “But in his spare time, he is just a normal young boy who likes to hang out with friends.”

“I love all sports. I am regular boy.”

The 18-year-old Jenkins also faced a tough, emotional moment.

“I actually struggle with that,” Carter says. “I need to consistently tell myself, ‘slow down,’ so that I can think about what I am doing before I had shot.”

Carter tries his best to deal with these moments, reminding himself to stay calm and patient while in bad situations.

“You can’t play golf when you’re frustrated,” said Jenkins.

Regarding of his goals Jenkins has a grandiose plan.

“Graduate from UNCG and head to the PGA tour,” he said.

Added Dr. Bob Christina, Carter’s assistant coach: “stay in the present, play one shot at a time.”