Sandra Shamas smiling

Climbing menopause mountain with Sandra Shamas

Comedic writer Sandra Shamas’s journey through menopause was a lonely and isolating experience.

In vintage Shamas style, though, she’s made it a little less lonely and isolating for the rest of us — and a heck of a lot funnier — with her latest show, The Big What Now, which ended a successful run in Toronto earlier this year and is now ready to hit the road.

Freshman Philip Buque takes skills on ice outside the box

Philip and Alex Buque grew up playing hockey in the winter, lacrosse in the summer.

Alex played varsity and is now a superstar goalie in the National Lacrosse League; now, younger brother Philip is taking his shot with the Saint Leo University Lions.

Todmorden Legion event honours legendary member

Angie Gualtieri holds a book in her hands. Tales of Todmorden Veterans by Jack Aldred. It’s obvious this book means a lot to her.

Gualtieri recalls when the roof at her Royal Canadian Legion Todmorden, Branch 10, needed fixing. The branch couldn’t afford to fix it. Jack Aldred, a well-loved member of the branch, stepped up. Proceeds from Aldred’s helped raise money for the roof repairs.

“That’s who (Jack) was,” Gualtieri said. “A great man.”

Author highlights how Marconi ‘shrank’ the world

The year was 1912. On April 15, the sinking RMS Titanic sent out distress signals received by nearby ships. While more than 1,500 died in the sinking, during the next few hours on the North Atlantic, rescue ships picked up more than 700 survivors. Marc Raboy believes there was an upside to the disaster.

“(It) really opened the imagination to the importance of wireless communication,” he said. He credits wireless radio inventor Guglielmo Marconi.

“The world would never be the same again,” Raboy said. “We now had the capacity to do long distance communication.”

Lions freshman Sydney Drummings adapting to change

ST. LEO, FLA. – Freshman Sydney Drummings has a tall task ahead of her. The 5-foot-11 South Plantation alum is confident in her field lacrosse skills heading into the new year and knows size has something to do with it. “My height, my dominant left hand when cradling and going down the field, my positive energy, […]

IMAX film inspires students to dream big

Pricilla Daniel sits in a large dining area at the Ontario Science Centre. She’s just had an unexpected movie experience.

“I thought we were just going to watch a movie,” she said, “but it was more than a movie. This was an experience.”

Shronak Datta saw the same movie. It explored an unusual aspect of engineering.

“Engineering is often too closely associated with economics,” he said. “The movie focused away from that and focused on how engineering is a method of problem solving in society. That really resonated with me.”

Journalist recalls days of racist attitudes in Toronto

A prominent Toronto journalist, originally from Trinidad and Tobago, says that racism has always existed in the news media industry where he works.

Jules Elder, a founding member of the Canadian Association of Black Journalists (CABJ), spoke to journalism students at Centennial College’s Story Arts Centre on Feb. 14. In the mid-1970s he helped launch Share Newspaper, a weekly newspaper serving the Black and Caribbean communities in Toronto.

Singer notes Black history content in songs of the 1960s and ’70s

Rich Pearson learns more and more about the music he performs, especially this time of year.

When he recently sang Paul McCartney’s lyrics, “Blackbird singing in the dead of night, take these sunken eyes and learn to see; all your life, you were only waiting for this moment to be free,” he realized the song wasn’t about birds at all.

“(McCartney) was thinking about the civil rights movement at that time he wrote it; he wrote it at the 68,” Pearson said.

Carmen and Suzanne Kirschling

Washington women’s march also a personal statement

Eva James may well have needed the march in Washington to prove that her mother Carmen Kirschling was right.

“I always believed women were the strength of a nation,” Kirschling said. “That’s how I was raised, and how I tried to raise my daughter.”

James, 34, said she was devastated when she learned that Donald Trump was elected U.S. president.

“I started hearing what Donald Trump was saying about women and then I heard that other people were starting to accept what he said as the truth,” James said. “I didn’t want that for women, especially the younger girls who don’t know who they are just yet.”