‘You don’t have to be a basketball player or a rapper or a drug dealer to take care of your family’: Jayscale

Jamal Burger, better known as Jayscale, is most famous for his captivating cityscape photographs from the tops of Toronto’s high rises. Now a few years removed from school and with his career flourishing, Burger plans to use his talents to uplift the next generation of young people, including those in the public housing complex where he grew up.

Daffodil Month over, but fight against cancer goes on

“Sixty years ago, it was Lady Eaton whose family owned Eaton’s department store. She started to do some fundraising lunches or fundraising teas and she used daffodils to decorate them. It basically became the symbol for the month and then the symbol on our logo for the Canadian Cancer Society,” Patricia McLaughlin said.

Sandra Shamas smiling

Climbing menopause mountain with Sandra Shamas

Comedic writer Sandra Shamas’s journey through menopause was a lonely and isolating experience.

In vintage Shamas style, though, she’s made it a little less lonely and isolating for the rest of us — and a heck of a lot funnier — with her latest show, The Big What Now, which ended a successful run in Toronto earlier this year and is now ready to hit the road.

Putting a face on voicelessness

It’s the holiday season and the homeless shelter at Yonge and Sheppard is eerily empty. The majority of the women and girls who usually populate the YWCA have left to join their families. Except for Elisheva Passarello. She walks the halls by herself once again; it has been five years since she has seen her son, let alone spent a holiday with him.

“What was hard was homeless people often have someone; I had no one, not even my own son,” Passarello said. “What’s more difficult was that he didn’t have me.”

Amy Moledzky and John Rutledge with daughter Ava

Family learns to cope with post-natal depression

John Rutledge felt overwhelmed. He had experienced the sleepless nights, changing diapers, finding that one bit of furniture not yet “child-proof.” After his daughter Ava was born, Rutledge became even more stressed and anxious, to a point where he knew something wasn’t right.

“We were in the doctor’s office and it felt like I was in free fall,” Rutledge said.